LEAP Ready to Jump Ahead of CFM56

by Carter Palmer, Power Systems Specialist, Forecast International.

LEAP-1B Engine. Source: CFM International

The completion of the biennial Paris Air Show marks a time when orders are tallied and success is measured. The battle for orders between Airbus and Boeing is not new; however, with each airframe sold, suppliers also reap the rewards, particularly engine manufacturers. Continue reading

Solar Turbines – A Top I&M Market Performer

by Carter Palmer, Power Systems Specialist, Forecast International.

Source: Solar Turbines

Source: Solar Turbines

From its beginnings in pre-Depression America, Solar Turbines –  a Caterpillar company based in San Diego – has grown to command a top spot in the gas and steam turbines market.  Whether for industrial or marine applications, gas and steam turbines occupy a vast market, but just four manufacturers will account for more than 75 percent of the I&M market in the coming fifteen year period (2016-2030). The situation is different in terms of unit production –  where turbine size is a major factor in the number of units produced. Continue reading

Rafale and M88 Gaining Traction on the Export Market

by Carter Palmer, Power Systems Specialist, Forecast International.

Dassault Rafale

Dassault Rafale

From Bleriot’s cross-channel flight to the Concorde’s cross-Atlantic dash, the French have long been at the forefront of aviation. Indeed, the Montgolfier brothers were the first to fly into the heavens as early as 1783. But, then again, the Concorde was not wholly a French product. And, that raises an interesting question:  Do the French still have this penchant for flying or have the realities of modern aircraft development left them behind? Continue reading

World Power Generation by Gas and Steam Turbines Increasing Steadily, So Why Is the Production Curve Relatively Flat?

By Stuart Slade, Gas Turbine Systems Analyst, Forecast International.

The above graph refers only to steam turbines used in conjunction with gas turbines in cogeneration applications. It is entirely possible that we missed some likely cogen applications, as inevitably happens. Further, there are many pure steam installations that will continue to operate independently with other heat sources.

The above graph refers only to steam turbines used in conjunction with gas turbines in cogeneration applications. It is entirely possible that we missed some likely cogen applications, as inevitably happens. Further, there are many pure steam installations that will continue to operate independently with other heat sources.

There is a curious anomaly developing in the power generation industry: While demand for electricity is rising steadily and shows no sign of leveling off, let alone declining, the number and aggregate value of large power generation gas turbine sales are actually showing a slow but steady decline.  A detailed and nuanced appraisal points to a complex picture underlying this situation.

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